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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it a-- it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
this government create an environment for small business. i come from a long line of small business. i owned a small thises and ran a small loss form -- long form for many years. business acumen does not translate into good government. what we need in maine and in america is to invest in education, infrastructure, to reform our taxes, to reduce our spending, and to get this economy on track so the government can provide an environment for small businesses to grow and prosper and to help families get through this economy. the disparity in income is the biggest problem. what might two major opponents offer is more of the same. >> we have some business owners. does anyone want to answer? >> i am not a small business owner. i never said i was. i am self-employed. i am a free-lance writer. if you are a political pundits like i am, if you run for senate, you are no longer a political pundit. not only have i not created a job, but i cost myself a job by running for office. on that question, i do not have a good record. >> i think it is sad the recently we have looked at government services as being
approval rating -- of an approval rating in this environment getting thrown out, getting rejected. caller: he covers politics for the "philadelphia inquirer." the poll out this morning -- results available online. thank you for being with us. let's give back your phone calls. mike joins us from pennsylvania, democrat line. good morning. caller: good morning. my question is, with the controversy around the voter i.d. issue, the republican legislature suppressing turnout, do you think this will in any way suppress turnout and, if so, will it be enough to effect the margins in any way? thanks. host: thanks for the call. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that requires pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id is. if you did not have one in the meantime, the state would provide you with one. you had to go through certain procedures to get a photo id. more recently, in the last few weeks, a state judge simply set aside that particular provision of the law so that pennsylvanian is on november 6 -- you'll be asked to show one of those six forms of id. if you d
it in a responsible way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. ashink, let's use this area an example that we can hold up around the rest of the country. >> rebuttal from con
way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. -- the reliance on foreign fuel. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. i think, let's use this area as an example that we can hold up around the rest
themselves quite well in the debates. but the point is, they're in this larger environment, what is going to go on. i worry we're going to see muddling through instead of clear-cut tax reform, infrastructure program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's --
. small businesses are taxed at 35%. that is not sustainable in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a -- these problems create an impediment to congress meant -- an impediment to commerce. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural in
or were the brokers not ready to operate in that environment? this is a big question. i will tell you this, liz, you want exchanges to be open now. i don't care what anybody -- a storm should not shut down capitalism. liz: wait even if it's --? >> no. liz: you shut down the floor but keep the electronic trading going. >> in this environment we can trade stocks in milliseconds. a storm, rain should not stop the new york stock exchange from opening its system. it should not stop the nasdaq or any of them. a small investor, maybe some trader can't get to work that works at goldman sachs, that's fine. but the bottom line is, the average investor should be able to trade stocks, buy a stock right now when they want. the system should not be shut down because of the storm. and it's absurd when you think about it. we've had years and years of technology -- liz: well traders were e-mailing me and said i'm upset, i wanted to go to work, i can handle this. >> it is one thing to be physically on the floor. the question is for a small investor and these markets are for the public too, by the way. the a
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
an understanding of an environment -- if you come back to - 0, about focusing on the customer and producing products that our customers really want and value, it is an understanding in a sense of the economics, distribution, vehicles, the supply base. i talk about the 12,000 jobs at ford, the jobs in the supply base and related engineering activities. i really just keep coming back to the market itself, the opportunity to put great vehicles out there, to focus on the things people really want, and to talk back to the high- tech jobs. historically, our industry, particularly the domestic manufacturers in the detroit area -- for now, competitors of rust belt. we made a commitment to engineer the highest quality vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in every sector the we compete in every market around the world. if you come back to some of the investments i mentioned earlier, a very large percentage of those investments have been in very high-technology power trends, weather they are hybrid vehicles, battery, electronic vehicles. we now have six electrified the nichols we will be selling
to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. >> narrator: then, when he was ten, his mother sent him to hawaii to live with his grandparents. >> i think it's natural to assume that your father be absent, then form a relationship with your stepfather, and then be separated from him and be separated from your mother and go live with your grandparents who at that point you don't really know that well... it must have been profoundly unsettling. >> his early life is a constant stream of people leaving, of him being left. his mother, his father, his grandparents constantly moving. his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home. >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that h
it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. c2 >> nrator: then, when he wasas ten, h mothesent him t to ve with his grandparents >> i think is natura assume thayour fbe absent, then fm a reship wi yr ster, and en be separat from him and ber sepad fr yr mo and go liv yougrandpar o at that point you don' ally knoat w it mushave bn profound unseng. >> h early l a cstant stream opeople lving, h beg left his moer, his ther, his grandpar cstany moving his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home.mo >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that his grandmother was an alcoholic, too. >> narrator: but barry had gotten lucky. hawaii's most
and youtube. tweets on twitter. people go on the site and cares about environment the syria club might be featured. they pay for advertising that way. >> and that is enough to keep it -- how big is that? >> 150 staff around the world. >> wow. 20 million members. >> that's a lot of . >> yeah. toll it's about the massive kale. scale the number of people -- internet and that's amazings the capacity moral historical change. because of the facility and the rapid expansion because that have we have more members able to generate more revenue. >> we were talking about this last night on the panel. reheading toward if we have not passed a billion spent on television advertising. most going to nine states and 6 percent of the population. you're at the point it would been cheaper to buy every undecided voter a television at this point. hi i'm romney here with a plasma for you. i'm interested in your thought you mentioned politician and talking about congress in responding what about the way that -- you do you think the balance of the way we communicate in the race for president along with the sup
women's healthcare, not a single one of those votes talked about the environment, not a single vote talked about transportation infrastructure, not a single vote were dealing on education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the 10th district and are critical votes. my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. >> if we look at the record this congress, which is the most uneffective congress we've had, you voted twice on the ryan plan that turns medicare. a voucher plan. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted on them on issue after issue. >> congressman dold, your vote on obamacare, why you vote against it? >> you look at the affordable care act. there are things in there that are positive. >> how come? >> because i think we want to call it by its name. long end short, we got 21 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on new set ten years doubled. this is going to be enormously troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. you're talking about a t
have an environment in whichhe srms are going to be more intense. >> rose: look at the lessons. where do you put the three or four most important lessons we need to learn from this. >> when you talk about what are you going to do about coastal cities, what sort of defenses will you put in place if you want to have a city like manhan that's right on the coast, it's at sea level. can we not have that many people living close to the sea. we have almost 4 million americans living a if few feet of high tide. is it right to be insuring that kind of property as well. we also have to think about climate change. we can argue endlessly really and scientists do over exactly how much climate change plays what role with weather. but we know enough to take steps to deal with it. we know enough to have a plan in place to reduce carbon emissions over time. we don't have absolute certainly in foreign policy and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayorpoind to, carbon attacks or maybe able to measure carbon standards. where
. >>> time now 4:41. reusable grocery bags good for the environment. >> but they may not be so great for your health. also ahead... >> i want to be here... >> just days after being bitten by a great white, a california man is talking about the close encounter with a real-life "jaws." >> this is not the way to cross the border. the illegal crossing into arizona that turned into an epic failure. coming up. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, attempt to illegally cross o the u-s from mexico was an c failure. this one happened zona. the agency >>> take a look at this. this attempt to cross illegally from the united states to mexico was an epic failure. this one happened in yuma, arizona. the agency says two men inside the car ran back to mexico after their jeep got stuck at the top of a 14-foot fence. >> okay... how did they get up there in the first place is it. >> talk about being conspicuous? >> saw that. i thought it was a car commercial. >> i couldn't hear the audio behind it. i thought they were trying to sell a car. >>> there was rain on the way into work today. >> a little slick out there this morning. still
in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a work force but can move back and forth easily. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural industry, they can i get back and forth like a one-two. the rangers are telling us every day, we desperately need
discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went in an interview bin laden, the last western journalist the trekked into the mountains in afghanistan, and we did a prime-time special or two, but i had some dealings with the military in washington he said their biggest concern was an act of domestic terrorism. we had active discussions about doing more. in retrospect wish
to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> wikileaks claims it has released more than 100 classified or otherwise restricted files from the united states department of defense that relate to u.s. military policies relating to detainees. they say they'll continue to release more documents over the coming month. one man who made international headlines after he was accused of leaking to the group is bradley manning. his trial will not begin until next february, but over his last two years in prison, there are some who have tried to draw up support on manning's behalf and that include a music legend who is my guest today. joining me now from los angeles, singer, song writer and member of the rock 'n' rol
that kind of individualized attention may be harder to get now in the environment that states are moving to. states really there in the degree to which the shift to automated method is being pushed versus just being offered as an additional opportunity for accessing the program. and so i think it's important to remember that not all low income population of access to the technology, to the internet or the same ability to be able to use it. we hear about prepaid cell phone plans being a problem for people when have to wait on hold for a long time or participate in an interview over the telephone. many states are closing local offices, which would mean that people live in remote areas have to drive farther if they do want to be able to see somebody and talk to things within. and are increased, or still have reports of uncommon benefits, lost paperwork, long wait times in person and on the telephone. and auto closure, which is sort of the way fancy way of saying that the state had the cheerios for people but didn't have the time to act on it so the computer automatically will close cases. and
by running water are found in nearly every terrestrial environment on earth. they're even abundant in deserts, where sudden rainstorms and flash floods can produce more geomorphic change in a few hours than years of desert winds. but there would be no running water without slopes. land slopes are both created and maintained by tectonic activity. indeed, the shape of much of the earth's surface is the result of a constant competition between tectonic forces and the destructive effects of running water. nowhere is this duel between tectonism and running water easier to appreciate than here at the grand canyon, where the colorado river continues to sustain the evolution of one of the most beautiful and distinctive landscapes on earth. captioning performed by the national captioning institute, inc. captions copyright 1991 the corporation for community college television announcer: the bare necessities of living healthy are easy. just eat right, be active, and have fun. yeah! go to mypyramid.gov to find out more.
no matter what. we have created an environment that is toxic for businesses. we have radical deficit spending. we have a federal government out of control with the amount of red tape and things that they are imposing on businesses. we wonder why then we do not have any jobs and why that jobs are being sent overseas. talk is fine, but the fact of the matter is, the unemployment and the deficit and the whole situation with the economy speaks for itself. it is now working. big government is not the solution. >> thank you, congressman. our next question is a senior co editor for the globe news magazine. please ask your question. >> congressman akin, would you speak of your commitment to improving public school education in missouri? especially given the educational choices you have made for your own children. i am referring to your decision to home school your children and senator mccaskill's to send at least one of her children to private catholic schools. >> thank you for that question. all of us understand that education is critical. one of the things we have in america is something c
of difficult to imagine a president with with that high of approval in this kind of environment the getting thrown out, getting rejected. host: thomas fitzgerald, who covers politics for "the philadelphia inquirer." thank you for being with us. but it back to your phone calls. mike from pennsylvania, democratic line. good morning. caller: the morning, steve and terry. with controversy about the voter id lot to suppress turnout, do you think that this will in any way suppress turnout? if so, will it be enough to affect the margins in any way? thanks. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that required pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id's. if you did not have one, they would provide you with one but you have to go through certain procedures to get one. more recently, in the last three weeks, a judge in our states simply set aside that particular provision of law so that when pennsylvanian is go to vote on november 6th, you will be asked to show one of those six forms of identification. if you do not have one, you will still be permitted to vote. your vo
of replicating the floor environment trying to figure out where to move people to, we opt to do it electronically for a day or two doesn't make a statement or change my view about how we feel about the floor. you know how i feel about it. it's an important point of the model. in an emergency situation, do you what you need to do to keep the markets open. in terms of that, there is no doubt it could handle volume. until you test it in production, you're not going to know. so that was going to be the first production test to see and our guess is it would have gone fine. who knows. you also would not have been likely to see the volume and volatility you would have seen as a lot of people simply weren't going to participate today if we had tried to open as an industry. >> have you started to give thought -- one thing about flooding, you never really know what the extent of the damage is going to be. what if we go into wednesday? what if people start missing out on their last chances to unload options? >> we are thinking that far ahead as an industry and although we can't predict the weather, carl, i
the environment of people, machines and networks as a new do main of war and we realize that maybe one in 1,000 people understood what cyberspace was and the degree and denth of the vulnerabilities and what we're trying to do is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the idea is everybody from my mom and dad to congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> cyberspace vulnerabilities monday night on the communicate tors on c-span2. >> president obama was at the washington headquarters of the federal emergency management agency to discuss preparations for hurricane sandy. following the briefing, he spoke briefly with reporters. >> good afternoon everybody, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. and my first message is to all the people across the eastern coast going north that you need to take this very serious and follow the instructions of your state and local officials because they are going to be provi
. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people, machines and networks as a new do main of war and we realize that maybe one in 1,000 people understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities and what we're trying to do is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the idea is everybody from my mom and dad to congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> cyberspace vulnerabilities monday night on the communicators on c-span2. >> president obama was at the washington headquarters of the federal emergency management agency to discuss preparations for hurricane sandy. following the briefing, he spoke briefly with reporters. >> good afternoon everybody, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. and my first message is to all the people across the eastern coast going north that you need to take this very serious and follow the instructions of your state and local officials be
, which are limited government and lower taxes and less regulatory environment. in colorado, where you find is in her to give her as he moved west across the united states, and republican voter is a quasi- libertarian type of voter. it is limited government. it is kind of an old west at it, keep government out of our lives. i think you also see others that will move toward the center as well. it is limited government and less washington d.c. involvement in our lives. an oldhost: what is the makeupe state legislature? guest: we have a slight majority in the state house for republicans. we control the state house. and the senate, a slim majority for the democrats. the attorney general and other statewide elected officials are republican. and our governor is a democrat and very popular. it is representative of the voting population we are little helter-skelter. host: mary and westfield and new jersey, independent caller. caller: can you hear me? host: my fault, go ahead. caller: two questions. the president says that north america will be energy independent. how come the press does not re
in mexico. i was able to get out, a very dangerous time, very dangerous environment. >> chris, you start running drugs for a man named jack anders. can you describe for us that first experience when you were heading to wichita? >> i never did drugs so i don't understand the drug holder perce. the first drug i ran was 100,000. we negotiated the price. i got in the car and started driving and all i could think is what happens if my car breaks down or get a flat tire or in a wreck? i was freaking out over the fact the drug there in my car period. at that point dilutions of paranoia start sinking in a new see ghosts behind every tree and cops behind every bush and i thought i was going insane. >> you had a particularly ingenious disguise. >> there's a ski mountain north of el paso. i read this key reports and when i hit the border patrol checkpoint, the border agent never questioned me before. when i was running drugs i was younger and better looking because i had hair. you would ever guess i was involved in any sort of criminal enterprise. and i went about my way. was the first time he aske
was hoping we could talk a little bit about changing media environment. you mentioned that we haven't had a prosecution of reporter or media organization. but i'm wondering if you're faults are any challenges posed by the landscape, the emergency of the new organizations and technologies that might be as responsible and willing to listen to government requests. are we looking at the new era because of the kind of fragmentation of the media environment and what kind of challenges might there be for the classification regime and prosecutors going forward? >> you mean is aera journalist? >> it complicates the issue let's put it that way. it's not of "the new york times" >> neil? >> they're worried about the article on the front page of the post that has was that information you were thinking about now. all of new types of journalists or media operate under the constraints of the traditional media do. i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others when the of clauson for the information they think they have that information to the government and say look, you make the case for
environment. >> thank you. chris, so you start running drugs for a man named jeff andrews. can you describe for us the worst experience when you're heading up to wichita, right? >> yes, i never did drugs, so i don't understand the drug culture per se, but i'll never forget the first drug load iran was over 100 pounds. and we negotiated the price. i get in the car and start driving and all i can think was man, what happens if my car breaks down? what happens if i get a flat tire? what happens if they get in a wreck? i was out over the fact drugs or in my car. at that point, delusions and paranoia starts speaking in nbc's ghost behind every tree in cops behind every bush. i really thought i was going insane in that moment. >> she had a particularly ingenious disguise i thought. >> well, there's a ski mountain south of el paso sectors and skis in the car at the ski report. when i hit the border patrol check point, the border agent, they'd never question me before. when i was running drugs have as much younger and of course much better looking because i had hair. [laughter] so you would've neve
that he's been able to operate in the most difficult environments. as the governor just said he was the governor of probably the most democratic state in the country. but as a republican he sat done with people of different views and said let's figure out what we can agree on, what we can do. now this country has a lot of problems. we're spending money we don't have and that's got to end. we know mitt romney knows how to balance budgets. we know mitt romney knows how to fix the problems that are facing this country. [applause] so we need a leader like that in washington. i can tell you from experience the man in the white house has fallen short on his job of uniting people and pointing this country in a direction that offers us all hope. he has failed in that effort. i can also tell you we have tens of thousands of people in virginia who dedicate their life in uniform. many veterans know what i speak because we thank you and virge has hey rich heritage in playing a huge role in the defense of this country and the promotion of its national security. and thank you for that [applau
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)